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  • American,  Crime fiction,  Random,  Southern

    The Weight of Lies by Emily Carpenter

    When you are in a Southern crime fiction mood you just have to roll with it! After compiling some nice looking Southern mysteries last month I had no other option but to read Emily Carpenter’s The Weight of Lies. The novel came to my attention after a good friend swore it was the perfect reading when you are in a Gillian Flynn hangover – yes, that’s a thing – and I have to say, she was 100% right. The Weight of Lies by Emily Carpenter is a fast-paced mystery that tells the story of Meg Ashley, daughter to Frances Ashley, a best-selling author idolised by her 1970’s cult horror novel Kitten. Frances’ success…

  • Crime fiction,  Non-fiction

    Dear Michelle, We Got Him. I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara and the Golden State Killer

    2018 saw the publication of Michelle McNamara‘s posthumous work I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: A Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer(*). The US screenwriter and true crime expert were working on a new take on what she called the Golden State Killer when she suddenly passed away at the age of 46 in her sleep in April 2016. Michelle’s passion project remained in the safe hands of her her husband, comedian Patton Oswald who trusted editors Paul Heynes and Billy Jensen with her extensive body of work. The book was published in February 2018. The 25th April 2018 the Sacramento Police announced the arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo,…

  • Crime fiction,  TV/Movies

    Not Forgiven But Forgotten: Top of the Lake (Season 2) – China Girl

    The future is female, and so is crime television. 2017 became a game-changer with a previously unseen revolution of powerful and strong women fighting for their rights and openly denouncing the inequality and the violence – many times silenced – that has been historically embedded and tolerated in everyday life. Time’s Person of the Year for 2017 was a celebration of all the women who have spoken against this violence and who have taken the necessary steps to assure they get the justice they deserve. The Time’s Up initiative was made public days before the Golden Globes, where a relentless Natalie Portman openly denounced Hollywood’s inequality causing a stir and…

  • British,  Crime fiction,  Random

    Review: The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton (Raven Books, 8th February 2018) quickly became one of last Winter’s most anticipated books. I saw my Twitter feed flooded with people praising the book and once I learned that it was a modern take on a Golden Age mystery, I knew I had to get my hands on a copy. Thank you to Raven Books (Bloomsbury) for always supporting Bodies at the Library. The first thing that called my attention about The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle was that it was described as a modern take on a Golden Age mystery with a twist. I think it’s pretty obvious now that…

  • American,  Crime fiction,  Essays,  Random

    The Future and the Truth are Female: The Perfect Stranger by Megan Miranda

      Crime fiction is one of the most political forms of popular literature, and American women authors are killing it (no pun intended) with the likes of Gillian Flynn, Megan Abbott, Laura Lippman being responsible for a new golden age. The reasons for the success of female-authored crime fiction novels are many, but considering the current political climate, it is just natural to see how these narratives about social injustice and trauma as the perfect breeding ground for those stories that women have been keeping silent for years or even decades. Megan Miranda’s latest novel The Perfect Stranger (2017) perfectly exemplifies this new era and the role women are proactively…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    Lullaby (The Perfect Nanny) by Leïla Slimani – Translation by Sam Taylor

    A few weeks ago both my Twitter and Instagram feeds went crazy with a new crime fiction book. With a seemingly naïve cover portraying a blue dress with a peter pan collar and the line “The baby is dead. It only took a few seconds”, Leïla Slimani’s Lullaby – entitled The Perfect Nanny in the US – became the book everyone was reading. Marketed as the next Gone Girl (will it ever end?) and with a delightful translation by Sam Taylor, the novel published by Faber & Faber promised to be one of the books of 2018. Lullaby – Chanson Douce in the French original – tells the story of…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    When America Thought It was Great: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

    Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng had been on my radar for some time before I decided to make it my Christmas book. My favourite Bookrioter Wallace Yovetich had been posting pictures of on her Instagram account, and other readers had also been praising the book for its portrayal of American suburbia. Ng’s second book comes after the international success of Everything I Never Told You (2014), a novel about loss, trauma and family. I must admit I never got to read Ng’s debut novel, partly because I was not in a mood to read about family trauma when it was first released, and secondly because I never had the…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    This is How It Ends by Eva Dolan

    British author Eva Dolan has been on the radar for readers of high-quality and socially conscious crime fiction for some years now. Her Zigic and Ferreira series became known for targeting bones of contention in contemporary society, such as racism, human trafficking, and disability. In the past year, she has been working on a stand-alone novel, This is How it Ends (out Raven Press, 25th January 2018), and I was lucky to have one of the early review copies sent to me. The premise of This is How it Ends is really good: Young Ella Riordan has joined the protest groups in London trying to fight gentrification and the expulsion…

  • Crime fiction,  Nordic Noir

    The Snowman by Jo Nesbo

    I decided to read The Snowman by Jo Nesbø (2007) after I realised the film adaptation was about to come out and it would be perfect for a dark, rainy Saturday evening. Two things happened that will surprise no bookworm: Everyone told me the film was horribly made (apparently something to do with reshootings), and I loved the book. Since I am having some serious trouble finding space for new books and I am an avid public library user I borrowed the Spanish translation from my public library with the blessing of the librarian, who has known me since I was 3. She said I would love it, and as…