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  • Personal Updates,  Random

    20 Reading Questions

    Gooood morning everyone on a beautiful and sunny Monday morning! Twitter was buzzing with some great blogging activity a few weeks ago and I couldn’t join back then, but following my dear MarinaSofia’s example, I thought I’d answer the 20 Reading Questions here keeping in mind the 280-character Twitter rule 😉 Women’s fiction. I am reading two at the time! Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout (short stories), and Tree of Sighs by Lucrecia Guerrero (Chicano Lit, because there is more to it than J.D). The Disappearing Cake. Always loved a good mystery! I would LOVE to see all of Gillian Flynn’s works adapted for the big/silver screen by Reese…

  • Book Releases,  Random

    7 Crime Fiction Books You Cannot Miss in 2018

    Bookish people can’t help it. As 2017 is coming to an end all we can think about is all the new books that we are going to read in 2018. And it doesn’t get better. I have always been an impulsive reader and I only managed to schedule my readings during my English Literature degree because I loved lessons and I was obsessed with the professors spoiling the books for me. In my 6 years here, this is the first time not only that I am excited for books up to ten months prior to their publishing, but that I have a list of books, I know their release dates…

  • Best Books,  Random

    10 Best Books of 2017 #ReadWomen

    The time has come! While we wonder about where 2017 has gone, what we did, what we didn’t, time flies, and all those terrifying thoughts on how quickly time goes by, it is time to choose the best 10 books that I have read in 2017. As I usually combine new releases with backlists, some of this books were actually published in 2017, but some others were not. This post is also the perfect time to remind myself that reading is something that I mainly do for pleasure – though I am lucky enough for it to be a big part of my job too – so there should be…

  • Features,  She Writes

    She Writes:

    Today I am very happy to be bringing one of my favourite American crime fiction writers to you on the She Writes Series: Tess Gerritsen. She is the author of the Rizzoli & Isles series, which many of you may know from the TV adaptation that sadly came to an end last year. I have developed quite some research about Gerritsen’s works, and she has been pivotal in my PhD, always being kind, nice and having time to answer my questions. Before becoming world-wide famous thanks to the Rizzoli & Isles series, Gerritsen was a doctor with a passion for reading romances. She started writing short fiction – for which…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Medical Humanities

    Evening Primorse by Kopano Matlwa

    Evening Primrose by Kopano Matlwa was the first book that I got sent upon my arrival to England earlier this year. I first heard about it on Twitter, described as the perfect book to mix #readwomen and #readdiverse. So that was it for me. African literature was one of my favourite subjects during my degree, and for some time I even considered pursuing a PhD in the field (that is long before I realised that crime fiction studies were a thing!). So I was really excited to read Evening Primrose, especially after I read the blurb on the back cover: Maybe this was all my own doing. I should have…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

    Ruth Ware became an instant best-selling author when her debut crime novel In a Dark, Dark Wood came out in 2015. Since then, she has also published The Woman in Cabin 10, and the film rights to her first novel have been acquired by Reese Witherspoon. Ware’s latest novel The Lying Game came out this summer, and I was lucky to have been sent a review copy by Harvill Secker while I was away in England. The Lying Game starts with Isa, a new mom to baby Freya, who leaves her settled and middle-class life in London as soon as she gets a text messsage saying ‘I need you’. The…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Quieter than Killing (Marnie Rome #4) by Sarah Hilary

    Sarah Hilary is back with another instalment in the acclaimed Marnie Rome series. If you have followed this blog for some time, you will know that I am a great fan of the series, but also of Sarah, who I met at CrimeFest15 and who is always open to discuss feminism, and women’s crime fiction with me. No wonder she is an active member of Killer Women, a wonderful organisation that aims to bring together women in crime fiction. Now that I live in England, I was lucky to borrow her latest book from the Public Library (more on my love for British public libraries soon). Quieter than Killing take…

  • Best Books,  Random

    2016 In Review: Crime, Fiction, and Women

    2016 has been an interesting year. As I write this we have just heard of Carrie Fisher’s death. Bowie. Prince. Cohen. Brexit. Trump. Aleppo. The ‘alt-right’. George Michael. Spain’s turn to the right, once more. Let’s take a deep breath. 2016 has not been kind to us. Reading is, for many of us bookworms, a necessity, but also escapism. When I joined the blogging community 6 years ago (!!!!) I discovered that reading for escapism was considered a bad habit. You should read to become a better person, to learn. But, what if escaping our lives makes us better people? What if turning the news off and enjoying a good…

  • Non-fiction

    Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick

    This semester I joined a feminist book club that takes place in my favourite city and is led by a fellow feminist PhD candidate at my same programme. The club is organised nation-wide, with different physical meetings all over Spain by the feminist organisation La Tribu (‘The Tribe’). Our first reading was Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick, a non-fiction book, part memoir, about what it means to be single nowadays. The book has been translated into Spanish but I decided to go with the original for two reasons. One is that I read faster in English and I also enjoy the text more, the second…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Muse by Jessie Burton

    Author Jessie Burton became an international sensation when her first novel The Miniaturist became a best-seller across Europe. Back then my Twitter feed was full of praise for Burton and her debut novel. However, the story did not appeal to me at all, and after discussing this with other bloggers I decided I did not have to read a book just because everyone loved it. When Burton’s next novel The Muse came out last June I knew it was the right time to discover the author everyone loves. Thanks to Picador for the review copy. The Muse tells two different stories, both with women as main characters. In 1967 Odelle…