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  • Random

    Read Diverse: Asymptote Book Club

    Confession time: I don’t read much fiction in translation. Sure thing, I love Nordic Noir, and since I can only read Spanish, English and a bit of Italian and French I am obviously a consumer of works in translation. But I often wonder about the many works that I don’t have access to because they are not deemed good enough for translation. In this case, ‘good enough’ may mean a lot of different things: The story is different to what we usually read, the writer is now known, the story won’t sell, etc. And women play a key role in these prejudices: Women-led project and stories are more often than…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Medical Humanities

    Evening Primorse by Kopano Matlwa

    Evening Primrose by Kopano Matlwa was the first book that I got sent upon my arrival to England earlier this year. I first heard about it on Twitter, described as the perfect book to mix #readwomen and #readdiverse. So that was it for me. African literature was one of my favourite subjects during my degree, and for some time I even considered pursuing a PhD in the field (that is long before I realised that crime fiction studies were a thing!). So I was really excited to read Evening Primrose, especially after I read the blurb on the back cover: Maybe this was all my own doing. I should have…

  • Best Books,  Random

    2016 In Review: Crime, Fiction, and Women

    2016 has been an interesting year. As I write this we have just heard of Carrie Fisher’s death. Bowie. Prince. Cohen. Brexit. Trump. Aleppo. The ‘alt-right’. George Michael. Spain’s turn to the right, once more. Let’s take a deep breath. 2016 has not been kind to us. Reading is, for many of us bookworms, a necessity, but also escapism. When I joined the blogging community 6 years ago (!!!!) I discovered that reading for escapism was considered a bad habit. You should read to become a better person, to learn. But, what if escaping our lives makes us better people? What if turning the news off and enjoying a good…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    Shame by Melanie Finn

    When I read a quote from Shame by Melanie Finn on Elizabeth Preston’s and Simon Savidge‘s Twitter feeds, I knew I had to get my hands on it. After some research I found out that the book had been published last year and that the team behind it thought it was one of the best things they had ever published. Thanks to Weidenfeld & Nicholson for the review copy. The first pages of Shame describe how the main character, Pilgrim Jones, sees a small gesture between her husband and an unknown woman in a meeting in Switzerland. It was something small, maybe a smile, maybe the way they were too…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Ages of Lulu (1989) by Almudena Grandes

    Even though I am Spanish, I am not the biggest fan of Spanish literature. In fact, it is very seldom that I pick up a book either written by a Spanish author or translated into Spanish. However, last March I enrolled on a course about ‘Women in Literature’ that ended up being ‘Women in Spanish Literature’. Some of the authors rang a bell while others I knew: it is one of those times when you know the names and the titles of their works, but you have never read any of the novels. It was with this frame of mind that I realised I had to read The Ages of…

  • Short stories

    Reader, I Married Him (Short Story Collection) Edited by Tracy Chevalier

    Every time I review a short story collection, I always say I am not the biggest fan of them, but that is not actually true. During the time I have been writing here I have found a few marvellous collection that always become ‘one of the best books of…’. This time Hayley from Harper Collins sent me Reader, I Married HIm: Stories inspired by Jane Eyre, edited by Tracy Chevalier. I did not know anything about the collection before I was sent it, but I loved the idea of seeing how Jane Eyre has influenced contemporary authors. Harper Collins is publishing Reader, I Married Him on account of Charlotte Brontë’s…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Tastes Like Fear (Marnie Rome #3) by Sarah Hilary

    Last January I was one of the lucky bloggers to get a super early review copy of Tastes Like Fear, the third installment in the Marnie Rome series by Sarah Hilary. If you have not heard about the series, Marnie Rome or Sarah Hilary, I highly recommend you skip this review and check my review of Someone Else’s Skin (# 1) here or an interview with Sarah Hilary in which she discusses crime fiction, and the Marnie Rome series here, or check our talk about feminism and women writers here. If you have continued reading I can then start my enthusiastic review of Tastes Like Fear. Like No Other Darkness,…

  • Personal Updates

    It’s Monday! What are you reading? 

    A 5* review is coming up soon at Books & Reviews, but meanwhile I wanted to share what I’m reading, because this time it’s not crime fiction or even contemporary fiction written by a woman – I am fine, don’t worry. In the spirit of #ReadDiverse I took a look at my TBR pile and realised that I hadn’t read any sci-fi in a while. Not that I am too much of a fan, but it is a genre that I closely associate with crime fiction, since both belong to popular literature and are discredited as ‘bad/cheap’. So, here I am, reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968) by…