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  • Monthly Recommendations
    Crime fiction,  Forensic,  Random

    November Recommendations: Crime Fiction and Medicine

    Bodies in the Library’s recommendations come out the last day of each month and they aim to bring together great crime fiction reads for fans of the genre. The lists are eclectic and diverse, and they celebrate contemporary crime fiction writers and classics alike. This month’s recommendations are extra special to me because even though literature is clearly my first love, medicine follows very closely. My mum is a nurse, and some of my closest relatives are doctors so it was just a matter of time that showed an interest in the field. As you can imagine, medicine and crime fiction combine perfectly, especially after the CSI effect in the…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Medical Humanities

    Evening Primorse by Kopano Matlwa

    Evening Primrose by Kopano Matlwa was the first book that I got sent upon my arrival to England earlier this year. I first heard about it on Twitter, described as the perfect book to mix #readwomen and #readdiverse. So that was it for me. African literature was one of my favourite subjects during my degree, and for some time I even considered pursuing a PhD in the field (that is long before I realised that crime fiction studies were a thing!). So I was really excited to read Evening Primrose, especially after I read the blurb on the back cover: Maybe this was all my own doing. I should have…

  • 21st Century,  Essays,  Medical Humanities

    Why Patricia Cornwell is One of the Best Crime Fiction Writers (And Why You Should Be Reading Her Works)

    ‘Hi! My name is Elena and I’m writing a Humanities doctoral thesis. On Contemporary Literature. On crime fiction. On Patricia Cornwell’s books’. That is how much it takes me these days to get a look of embarrassment from many people, although luckily not my beloved ones. Not only am I pursuing a PhD in Humanities, which apparently is not nearly as important as my expected Medicine career (on which acquaintances gave up a long time ago), but I am also studying bad literature. Airport literature. Beach readings. Pop-corn crime fiction. Best-sellers. You name it. I have chosen the wrong path. Or so they say. Because, how can you build your…

  • Medical Humanities,  Non-fiction

    The Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf

    I borrowed The Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf from the school library last June, because I realised that it is one of those landmarks in feminist theory that I still had to read. During my degree, I had one of my now PhD supervisors talk about “The Third Shift” for women, and the idea stayed with me for a long time. Basically, Wolf establishes three working shifts for women: their job, domestic duties, and beauty routines/rituals. The three are compulsory for women in Western, affluent cultures, and they contribute to the sense of guilt and feeling dissatisfied with their (our!) lives. We never work enough, we never have a house…

  • Forensics. The Anatomy of Crime by Val McDermid
    Medical Humanities,  Non-fiction

    Forensics by Val McDermid

    Forensics (2015) by Val McDermid is a non-fiction book, and the official companion to the Wellcome Trust’s exhibition with the same name, that runs from January until June 2015. Because of the theme of this blog, and my PhD, fellow crime fiction academic Mrs.P encouraged me to pay my first visit to London to see the exhibition. After much thinking and planning, I made it to the City a month ago, and what can I say? I fell in love with it. Reading Forensics has been one of the most pleasurable readings of 2015. I had been trying to get back to my normal reading for some months, and this…

  • Crime fiction,  Forensic,  Medical Humanities

    Body of Evidence (Scarpetta #2) by Patricia Cornwell

    Body of Evidence is the second of the Kay Scarpetta novels. My wonderful man bought me a gorgeous hardback edition containing both Postmortem and Body of Evidence. I read Postmortem last Christmas and decided to read a book (Kate Morton’s The Secret Keeper) before facing Scarpetta #2.   From Book Depository: A reclusive writer is dead. And her final manuscript has disappeared …Someone is stalking Beryl Madison. Someone who spies on her and makes threatening, obscene phone-calls. Terrified, Beryl flees to Key West – but eventually she must return to her Richmond home. The very night she arrives, Beryl inexplicably invites her killer in …Thus begins for Dr Kay Scarpetta…