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  • British,  Crime fiction,  Random

    Review: The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton (Raven Books, 8th February 2018) quickly became one of last Winter’s most anticipated books. I saw my Twitter feed flooded with people praising the book and once I learned that it was a modern take on a Golden Age mystery, I knew I had to get my hands on a copy. Thank you to Raven Books (Bloomsbury) for always supporting Bodies at the Library. The first thing that called my attention about The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle was that it was described as a modern take on a Golden Age mystery with a twist. I think it’s pretty obvious now that…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    First Time Reading a Classic: And Then There Were None (1939) by Agatha Christie

    Confession time: I had never read or watched any adaptations of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None (1939) by Agatha Christie. Except for the Family Guy double episode, Psych‘s and the many other references in popular culture and media that I have watched. But, the original? Nope, never. It does not help that we have kept a literal translation of the original title Ten LIttle Niggers  in Spanish – click here to see it – and when I looked for an English second-hand review copy on Abebooks, I could find none. But, after some failed attempts, and some research, I found the original title, and after last Christmas’ super…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    An Unsuitable Job for a Woman by P.D James

    Back in September I bought three books for my PhD because I knew they were landmarks in crime fiction and I could not allow myself to start writing about female investigators without having read those classics. One of them was An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1972) by P.D James: From Goodreads: Handsome Cambridge dropout Mark Callender died hanging by the neck with a faint trace of lipstick on his mouth. When the official verdict is suicide, his wealthy father hires fledgling private investigator Cordelia Gray to find out what led him to self-destruction. What she discovers instead is a twisting trail of secrets and sins, and the strong scent…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers

    I have spent the last two weeks reading Murder by the Book by Sally Munt, a book published in the 90’s exploring feminist crime fiction. As you can imagine, there are constant references to classics, so I saw myself stopping my study routine to read two wonderful crime fiction classics that had been on my to-be-read list for quite a long time: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie and Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers. From Goodreads: Mystery novelist Harriet Vane knew all about poisons, and when her fiancé died in the manner prescribed in one of her books, a jury of her peers had a hangman’s noose…