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  • Non-fiction

    Four Non-Fiction Backlist Books for Women’s Month

    March is Women’s Month and thought at Bodies in the Library we celebrate women writers all year long, this time I have decided to write about non-fiction backlists for various reasons. The first is that as I’m growing older I find myself yearning for more non-fiction written by women and about women. The books I have selected here are all have something in common: They will make you feel better. Reading them actually feels like sitting down with a good friend to talk about your problems. The second reason to choose these books is that they are all backlist books so you will be able to find them at your…

  • Best Books,  Random

    10 Best Books of 2017 #ReadWomen

    The time has come! While we wonder about where 2017 has gone, what we did, what we didn’t, time flies, and all those terrifying thoughts on how quickly time goes by, it is time to choose the best 10 books that I have read in 2017. As I usually combine new releases with backlists, some of this books were actually published in 2017, but some others were not. This post is also the perfect time to remind myself that reading is something that I mainly do for pleasure – though I am lucky enough for it to be a big part of my job too – so there should be…

  • Non-fiction

    Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What It is to be a Woman in the 21st Century

    Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What It is to be a Woman in the 21st Century by indie publisher 404Ink took the Internet by storm some months ago. The book contains essays by women writers on their lived experience as women in the 21st century. The project caught the attention of feminist all over Twitter, and it was even backed up by Margaret Atwood herself: ‘An essential window into many of the hazard-strewn worlds younger women are living in right now.’ – Margaret Atwood (Twitter)  I first encountered Nasty Women through their Kickstarter campaign in which 404Ink aimed to get the book published, paid the 20 authors…

  • Non-fiction

    Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick

    This semester I joined a feminist book club that takes place in my favourite city and is led by a fellow feminist PhD candidate at my same programme. The club is organised nation-wide, with different physical meetings all over Spain by the feminist organisation La Tribu (‘The Tribe’). Our first reading was Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick, a non-fiction book, part memoir, about what it means to be single nowadays. The book has been translated into Spanish but I decided to go with the original for two reasons. One is that I read faster in English and I also enjoy the text more, the second…

  • Non-fiction

    Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

    Just of lately I have been very keen on non-fiction, which is a huge change taking into account I am usually all for a good crime novel. But I think my brain has switched to theory and non-fiction reading for the day, so it is a little bit difficult to switch off for the night. So, basically I looked at my TBR pile and realized that I had long wanted to read Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, a book I was kindly sent by Little Brown to review. My pleasure! From Goodreads: In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a…

  • Non-fiction

    A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

    A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf has been on my mind for a long time now and for 11 months on my TBR pile (thanks to Mr B&R). The work – first speech and then essay – is a landmark in feminist theory and it has been showing up in every task on my Master’s Degree since it began last November. So, Leah from Books Speak Volumes and I decided to do a read-along in October. You can check her review here. From Goodreads: A Room of One’s Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a…