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  • Personal Updates,  Random

    July Reading

    Although I enjoy free time in both June and September, I very much consider July and August to be my summer months. And being already 31st of July, this means that summer is almost over. Well, not exactly, that was one big exaggeration, but the 1st of August marks the middle of the summer and it is time to check on what I wanted to do this summer and face it with what I have actually done. Back in July I wrote a Top Ten list of books that I wanted to read this summer knowing that I wouldn’t read them all, but writing that list helped me sort my…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    The World Waiting to be Made by Simone Lazaroo

    I learned about Australian writer Simone Lazaroo and her works during her lessons at my M.A. Her debut novel, The World Waiting to be Made (1994) is partly autobiographical and can be studied as an amazing example of diasporic literature written by a woman. From Book Depository: A young woman journeys back to her birthplace, Singapore, and to Malacca, her ancestral home, to discover rich, complex and mysterious aspects of her own identity. Aspects of herself that had only been half remembered, hinted at, or understood during a dislocated childhood and adolescence growing up in contemporary suburban Australia.The World Waiting to be Made charts the uncertain progress of an outsider…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Suggested readings

    This is my last post on postcolonialism for the moment, so here you have the long-awaited and promised list of suggested works. Click on the titles to buy the books at Book Depository. UPDATE: I will update this list with works I get to read in my courses. POETRY Ten by Bernardine Evaristo The Next Poems by Mutabaruka Postcolonial Poetry in English NARRATIVE How to read the Air by Dinaw Mengestu (US migration) Small Island by Andrea Levy (Jamaica)     REVIEW The Long Song by Andrea Levy (Jamaica) The Help by Kathryn Stockett (US racism)  REVIEW The Constant Gardener by John LeCarré (Kenya) Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe REVIEW…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Small Island’s review

    Small Island by Andrea Lévy is part of my Caribbean Literature course this year along with Merle Hodge’s Crick, Crack Monkey. When I first went to the library, Small Island was the most appealing (despite its length) and I decided to give it a try first. Title: Small Island Author: Andrea Lévy Year of Publication: 2004 Pages: 560 Genre: narrative postcolonial/bestseller BBC Adaptation: 2009. By John Alexander, with Naomie Harris, Ruth Wilson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ashley Walters and David Oyelowo 3.75/5 Summary, from Book Depository: It is 1948, and England is recovering from a war. But at 21 Nevern Street, London, the conflict has only just begun. Queenie Bligh’s neighbours do…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Slavery and scars.

    Yesterday we looked at the definition of the colonised people by the colonisers thanks to the work of professor Edward Said. Today, I would like to explore another important issue related to the identity issue. First of all, be beware: there is not a real and ultimately valid truth in what we are discussing. Literature, like any other kind of art, cannot be as clearly defined as maths so, if you don’t agree, please take some time to share your views with us! Slavery. The unspeakable, peculiar institution. Take for example the Caribbean colonies: when Christopher Columbus arrived, native people were exterminated and when labourers (or, to put it plainly,…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Doubts and Orientalism.

    The good thing about blogging is that allows a fluid communication and flow of ideas. Here are some I’d like to comment on: Amanda said: One thing I’ve wondered about though previously–do we have to be careful in looking at other viewpoints (female, minority, etc.) to not praise them just for being “other,” but to carefully evaluate their worth as well? Absolutely! Thanks to your response I can introduce Edward Said’s work Orientalism. In that wonderful book, he dealt with how the West represents the East. Have you ever thought about it? If you had the opportunity to approach a colonial text, you will find  a patronizing point of view:…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. An introduction.

    Reading Jillian’s blog A Room of One’s Own, I noticed that, despite she is reading the great classics of the American and English literature, she had forgotten part of the British Empire and its works: those from the colonies, productions that can be broadly labelled under  postcolonial literature. She was shocked and asked other readers for their opinion and me, obviously, for an explanation. So, after some talking, we’ve agreed a post would help many readers and, luckily, help them discover another perspective. So, why postcolonial? Why is it interesing? If the canon is the canon, there should be a reason for it, shouldn’t it? As a consequence, I am…

  • Poetry,  Postcolonial

    Poem: Prison by Mutabaruka

    It has just been published that Mubarak has renounced. So, in honour of those who have fought for the liberty of the whole country: Prisoner by: Mutabaruka You ask me if I have ever been to prison Been to Prison? Your world of murderer’s and thieves Of hatred and jealousy of death And you ask me if I have ever been to prison I answer, Yes I am still there trying to escape. I don’t usually like poetry, but this is one of my favourite pieces. It is simple, direct and yet it describes the struggle of many people against an oppresive power. Mutabaruka is a Rastafarian, social poet belonging…