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  • Random

    My First Time Reading Romance: One Day in December by Josie Silver (Reese Witherspoon’s Book Club Pick, December 2018)

    Confession time: I had never read a contemporary romance novel until 2018. It was not something intentional and definitely not something based on any prejudices. I think it all comes from not being a particularly romantic person – anyone else out there running from big gestures? But some of my favourite Booktubers and bloggers love romance, so by 2018 I had learned quite a bit about the genre. For example, that it is socially estimagtised and marked as ‘women’s reading’ or ‘chick-lit’ because it is something read mostly by women. It was precisely this snippet of information that so much resembles the perception of crime fiction that made me become…

  • Book Releases,  Random

    7 Crime Fiction Books You Cannot Miss in 2018

    Bookish people can’t help it. As 2017 is coming to an end all we can think about is all the new books that we are going to read in 2018. And it doesn’t get better. I have always been an impulsive reader and I only managed to schedule my readings during my English Literature degree because I loved lessons and I was obsessed with the professors spoiling the books for me. In my 6 years here, this is the first time not only that I am excited for books up to ten months prior to their publishing, but that I have a list of books, I know their release dates…

  • Best Books,  Random

    10 Best Books of 2017 #ReadWomen

    The time has come! While we wonder about where 2017 has gone, what we did, what we didn’t, time flies, and all those terrifying thoughts on how quickly time goes by, it is time to choose the best 10 books that I have read in 2017. As I usually combine new releases with backlists, some of this books were actually published in 2017, but some others were not. This post is also the perfect time to remind myself that reading is something that I mainly do for pleasure – though I am lucky enough for it to be a big part of my job too – so there should be…

  • Random

    News!

    Books & Reviews was born as a blog where I could post reviews and my thoughts about what I was reading at the time. 7 years later, the blog has clearly shifted to crime fiction and women, and I wanted the new name to reflect this. This is how Bodies in the Library was born. There are quite a few reasons for this name. The first one is a reference to Agatha Christie’s novel The Body in the Library. Since this is a blog mainly focused on crime fiction and women, it was very important for me to keep the link between both. The second one is symbolic: Women have…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Quieter than Killing (Marnie Rome #4) by Sarah Hilary

    Sarah Hilary is back with another instalment in the acclaimed Marnie Rome series. If you have followed this blog for some time, you will know that I am a great fan of the series, but also of Sarah, who I met at CrimeFest15 and who is always open to discuss feminism, and women’s crime fiction with me. No wonder she is an active member of Killer Women, a wonderful organisation that aims to bring together women in crime fiction. Now that I live in England, I was lucky to borrow her latest book from the Public Library (more on my love for British public libraries soon). Quieter than Killing take…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    How to be Both by Ali Smith

    How to be Both by Ali Smith became an instant success after its publication 2014. Back then all I could see on my Twitter feeds was praise for an author that I had never Heard about. So, after seeing that her latest book Autumn has also been welcomed with equal enthusiast for people I trust, I decided to finally read How to be Both. I borrowed this book from the Bristol Central Library. “Cause nobody’s the slightest idea who we are, or who we were”. How to be Both is a novel about fluidity and ambiguity. As the title suggests, a constant theme in both parts of the book is…

  • Author Interviews,  Features

    Interview with Paula Hawkins for Crime Fiction Association

    As many of you now know I am also a freelancer writer and an organiser for the Captivating Criminality 4 conference, an annual event organised by the Crime Fiction Association. A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to interview writer Paula Hawkins (The Girl on the Train) yet again for the Association’s blog and we discussed women, crime, and her latest novel Into the Water. To read the interview, click here.

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud

    The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud had been on my radar for a long time. So much so that when I decided to do some second-hand bookshop in Cardiff last year I knew I would buy a copy of the book if I found it. For those of you who kept recommending the book to me: Thank You. The Woman Upstairs tells the story of Nora Eldridge, a middle-aged teacher who sees her conventional American class and life disrupted with the arrival of a new pupil from France. Nora describes herself in the first lines of the book as ‘a good girl’, and that is probably the description that best…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    He’s Gone by Alex Clare

    Last January’s Women’s March events all over the world raised a lot of questions about who had a right to participate, and why. The concept of “woman” has been destabilised and questioned since Simone De Beauvoir announced to the world that one becomes a woman, rather than being born one. In fact, postmodern theorists like Judith Butler have denied the existence of a subject that exists under the label ‘woman’, and instead advocates for a more diverse take on womanhood that breaks away with society’s traditional constructions and expectations.  He’s Gone explores this postmodern postulate by having a trans-woman detective as a main character. Meet Robyn Bailley, DI of the…

  • Crime fiction,  International,  Random

    Ofrenda a la tormenta by Dolores Redondo – Giving Closure to the Baztan Trilogy

    Right after I finished reading The Lecagy of the Bones by Dolores Redondo I knew I had to read the next (and last) installment in the Baztán Trilogy. Keeping on the promise I made to myself to use the public library as much as I can, I borrowed Ofrenda a la Tormenta – ‘Offering to the Storm’, though there is no translation to English available yet – and I got lost in the dense greenery of the Baztán valley one last time. The story picks up right after The Legacy of the Bones, with D.I Amaia Salazar chasing the network of criminals that has been targeting the families of the…