Advertisements
  • Features

    Getting to Know the Author: Sophie Hannah

    One of my new tasks in my recent move to the UK is to help organise an event in which some crime fiction writers are involved (more information on the event soon!). As the crime fiction family is such a big and diverse one, I was not surprised to realise that I had never read anything about one of the women authors participating, but I was certainly curious about her work. In an effort to solve that gap in my reading history I have decided to do some research about the author and read at least one of her novels. Here’s Sophie Hannah: British novelist and poet Sophie Hannah was…

  • Non-fiction

    Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick

    This semester I joined a feminist book club that takes place in my favourite city and is led by a fellow feminist PhD candidate at my same programme. The club is organised nation-wide, with different physical meetings all over Spain by the feminist organisation La Tribu (‘The Tribe’). Our first reading was Spinster. Making a Life of One’s Own by Kate Bolick, a non-fiction book, part memoir, about what it means to be single nowadays. The book has been translated into Spanish but I decided to go with the original for two reasons. One is that I read faster in English and I also enjoy the text more, the second…

  • Feminist Sundays

    Feminist Sundays: Margaret Atwood

    Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. Today, I wanted to return to the quick profiles and share some information about one of the most inspiring feminist writers out there: Margaret Atwood. Name: Margaret Atwood Dates and place: Born in 1939 in Ottawa, she grew up in northern Ontario and Quebec to where her father’s job as a zoologist…

  • Feminist Sundays,  General Fiction

    Feminist Sundays: Mary Astell

    Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. Since I am enjoying my Winter Break, this week I would like to devote my post to Mary Astell who played a key role in women’s education in the UK back in the 18th century. Name: Mary Astell Dates and place: Born in Newcastle in 1666 died in 1731. Historical period: Englightenment:…

  • 19th century,  Feminist Sundays,  General Fiction

    Feminist Sundays: Elizabeth Gaskell

    Happy 1st of December! I’m back with yet another Feminist Sunday 🙂 Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. Today I’ll be presenting you a personal favourite of mine and my readers: 19th century English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. You can read a more extensive biography and study of her main works here. But today I will give you a…

  • 19th century,  Features,  General Fiction

    Mrs. Gaskell – A biography

    When choosing a project for my 19th century literature lesson I had a lot of authors to choose from: Austen, Dickens, Elliot, the Brontës… but Elizabeth Gaskell was not on the program! After consulting with my professor, we both agreed I could work on Mrs. Gaskell and Cranford for my presentation. The truth is, I could not be happier! First I read Cranford and then, when planning my first lesson as a teacher, I realized I could not tell my classmates about the book without referring to the author. So, here goes some information on Elizabeth before I publish my Cranford review. Sometimes, the life of authors is key to…