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  • Essays,  Random

    Banned Books and Women

    Banned Books weeks is happening right now and as I was browsing all your posts and Tweets, I realized that there is a close connection between banned books, feminism and women, and after Emma Watson’s speech (‘If not me, who? If not now, when?’) I realized it was high time I wrote about it. Because I cannot even imagine what it is to be banned from reading books, or getting an education or reading stories about women who transgressed social rules, defying what was expected of them and being banned by society. So, to start, let’s look at what banned books are. It certainly sounds like something from the past,…

  • Essays,  Random

    Emma Watson is a Feminist (and so should you)

    I am sure you have already seen this, but if not, here is Emma Watson – UN Women’s Goodwill Ambassador – calling out to stop feminism being the f-word. Defining herself as a feminist, and spreading the word about what feminism really means, for both men and women. I love that she highlights the importance of feminism which means nothing more and nothing less than fighting for a gender equality that is till not accomplished. She has launched the campaign #HeforShe to make people aware that men also need feminism to fight against the rigid gender definitions that still constrain their lives and their identities. Oh, and did I tell…

  • Essays,  Random

    The Man Booker Prize Longlist 2014: Where Are the Women?

    This Sunday I was going to write a post about the Man Booker Prize as well, but I think Naomi did an amazing job and I prefer to reblog hers. Her post appears on the WordPress Freshly Pressed and has encouraged some healthy discussion on women’s right on the comments section. Meanwhile, I would like to stress how important and crucial it is that we – as a society – support and empower women writers. I love reading women authors and I talk to mostly female publicists and agents on Twitter. So, I wonder, why can’t women be closer to 50% in prizes like this one. I also wonder if…

  • Essays,  Random

    Gender In Our Narratives

    Just recently I was indulging in some Julianne Moore awesomeness when I found this quote: My friends make jokes that I won’t go see something if there’s only men in it because I don’t know who to look at. Like big war films. I don’t have a way in here. Let me in. Give me a woman to look at so I can enter the story. So I think you want to represent other women and give them access to tell their stories. Source The quote led me to think about what I read and I have to admit that for the last year and a half in most of…

  • Essays,  Random

    Two Books? Reading Habits and Change

    Just lately I’ve been “back” to reading after some weeks studying for my last final and then nervously waiting for my mark. For those weeks, I spent all my concentration studying every single trace of Middle and Renaissance English and by the end of the day al my mind could afford was a few The Simpsons episodes and lying in bed staring at the ceiling seriously. But now that things are going back to normal, I’ve found my reading habits a little different from I remembered them. Some nights ago, as I closed Body of Evidence i realised I was craving more reading, but was somehow done with Kay Scarpetta,…

  • Essays,  Random

    On Criticism

    I’m one subject away from having a degree in English Literature. I have been passionately reading my whole life. I’ve restored to books when I was happy, when I was sad, when I did not understand what was going on and also when I knew but needed a break from reality. In school, college and more importantly, at home, I was tought to be critical: I was told I would encounter injustices and I had the right to complain. I was also told there are some fights worth engaging in and some others it’s best to leave unfought and to distinguish them, one needs some critical thinking. It takes critical…

  • Essays,  Random

    Some thoughts on writing

    What a wonderful day! Today I just woke up feeling energized and looking at the bright side of life. I may be that it’s sunny for the first time in a month (although I am not a fan of sun!) or that I finally got to sleep as much as needed and wanted or, maybe it’s just the day. Lately I’ve been writing a lot, not because I have to but because I want to. I need to. Apart from reading and writing reviews here, I was lucky enough to have been encouraged by my teachers and professors to develop my writing skills from an early age, but somehow I…

  • Essays,  Random

    On getting an e-reader

    When my aunt confessed over Christmas that she had planned on buying me a Kindle I was offended. Me? Loving edition and the publishing world so much, reading on an e-reader? Nope, thanks. I love books, I really do: I like to feel them, look at the pages, the font, the editing in general and, at the end of the day, I truly adore my tiny library. I thought that reading on e-readers was not comfortable: people are always complaining about the weight of physical books but I find paperback editions to be really helpful regarding this matter. But as soon as I graduated, a little voice started to ask…

  • Essays,  Random

    On contemporary literature

    I’m reading Treasure Island for A Victorian Celebration and… I don’t like it. I expected a lot of treasure things going on, but it is a story of buccaneers and pirates with a mischievous little boy fooling around (as you can see I’m angry at a book). The only thing that makes the book a little bit more pleasant is Long John Silver (and he is the bad guy). So, I asked myself: what would you like to read right now? And the answer was contemporary literature. Crime and detective novels, feminist novels, Margaret Atwood, Freedom by Jonathan Franzen, English plays from the 20th century, Kate Atkinson, bring it on!…

  • Essays,  Random

    The Classics Issue – Women in Literature

    Just a week ago I made my presentation on Mrs. Gaskell’s Cranford. But two days ago something happened that made me think about the way we approach literature. Here goes the winter of my discontent: A senior student classmate (she must be 70) approached me on Monday to talk about my presentation on Gaskell. She told me how she liked it and how beautiful my English was and it was all compliments until she said: “But, well, whether Cranford is a classic or not, that’s another question.” And I smiled. I had not mentioned the label “classic” in any part of my presentation, I only spoke about Mrs. Gaskell life…