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  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    Lullaby (The Perfect Nanny) by Leïla Slimani – Translation by Sam Taylor

    A few weeks ago both my Twitter and Instagram feeds went crazy with a new crime fiction book. With a seemingly naïve cover portraying a blue dress with a peter pan collar and the line “The baby is dead. It only took a few seconds”, Leïla Slimani’s Lullaby – entitled The Perfect Nanny in the US – became the book everyone was reading. Marketed as the next Gone Girl (will it ever end?) and with a delightful translation by Sam Taylor, the novel published by Faber & Faber promised to be one of the books of 2018. Lullaby – Chanson Douce in the French original – tells the story of…

  • When I Hit You by Meena Kandasamy
    21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    When I Hit You: Or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife by Meena Kandasamy

    When I arrived to England more than 4 months ago I only had two books with me, both of them in Spanish, and both of them intended to keep me company while travelling. But once I settled down I realised that my recent move was the perfect opportunity to request books to publishers that could not afford to send me their books all the way to Spain. So, seeing that everyone was showing off their new review copies of Roxane Gay’s Difficult Women, I wrote to Atlantic Books for a review copy. I soon got a reply from Sophie Walker kindly informing me that they were not publishing that book…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    The Australian Fiancé by Simone Lazaroo

    The Australian Fiancé is Simone Lazaroo’s second novel. I borrowed the book from a professor after Simone’s lessons and read if right after The World Waiting to be Made because the writing was so good, I wanted to see how the author’s style developed. From GoogleBooks: In 1949 a young Eurasian woman who survived the Japanese occupation of Singapore meets the son of a privileged Australian family and accompanies him to Broome. Captivated by this life and his photography, she comes to see herself anew, but is the image true? Themes of the novel are the aftermath of war, prejudice and alienation. Author was born in Singapore and lives in…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    The World Waiting to be Made by Simone Lazaroo

    I learned about Australian writer Simone Lazaroo and her works during her lessons at my M.A. Her debut novel, The World Waiting to be Made (1994) is partly autobiographical and can be studied as an amazing example of diasporic literature written by a woman. From Book Depository: A young woman journeys back to her birthplace, Singapore, and to Malacca, her ancestral home, to discover rich, complex and mysterious aspects of her own identity. Aspects of herself that had only been half remembered, hinted at, or understood during a dislocated childhood and adolescence growing up in contemporary suburban Australia.The World Waiting to be Made charts the uncertain progress of an outsider…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Postcolonial

    The Engagement by Chloe Hooper

    The Engagement is a novel by Australian author Chloe Hooper. I was lucky enough to win this novel at Naomi’s blog and I was really excited about it. Sadly, the book didn’t turn out the success both Naomi and I thought it would be. However, I would like to thank her for running the giveaway. From Goodreads (excerpt): Liese Campbell is working as an estate agent in Melbourne when she first meets Alexander Colquhoun. The handsome scion of a prominent farming family, he is searching for a pied-a-terre in the city. At another disappointing viewing, Liese leads Alexander to the bedroom, and they sleep together. Afterwards, he pulls out a…

  • Poetry,  Postcolonial

    Poem: A Far Cry from Africa by Derek Walcott

    Just recently I did a series on postcolonialism and did not include a wonderful author I did not know yet: Derek Walcott. He is a West Indian with mixed ancestry: two of his grandparents were black and two were white. Being superficial, the result could not be better: he got both blue eyes and dark skin. But, leaving superficial comments besides, his mixed ancestry has also influenced his work as an artist (a decision he took being a kid). However, reading one of his poems, I also found he is very influenced by the sea and the fluidity. This last concept of fluidity is very important in postcolonial theory: we…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Suggested readings

    This is my last post on postcolonialism for the moment, so here you have the long-awaited and promised list of suggested works. Click on the titles to buy the books at Book Depository. UPDATE: I will update this list with works I get to read in my courses. POETRY Ten by Bernardine Evaristo The Next Poems by Mutabaruka Postcolonial Poetry in English NARRATIVE How to read the Air by Dinaw Mengestu (US migration) Small Island by Andrea Levy (Jamaica)     REVIEW The Long Song by Andrea Levy (Jamaica) The Help by Kathryn Stockett (US racism)  REVIEW The Constant Gardener by John LeCarré (Kenya) Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe REVIEW…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. A personal experience by Risa

    Risa has kindly answered some questions for us regarding postcolonialism. She is a young, educated woman, from India. She studied English literature at university and is currently on hiatus from work, but she lent us some of her precious time. So, thank you a lot, Risa! Also, I would like to show you her blog, Bread Crumb Reads – it is great and very well informed, so don’t forget to pay her a visit as soon as posible. Risa for Books and Reviews: 1. When did you decide you wanted to study English Literature? Why? Did any particular work inspire you? I knew I was going to study English Literature…

  • Postcolonial,  Random

    Random Postcolonialism Post. Thanks!

    I’m not done with the postcolonial series yet. But I’m doing some research so I can post an extensive list of works for everyone to read: from poetry to theatre. I was wondering if you are also interested in films and/or art in general because I am taking a course on African Literature that is actually dealing with movies. Meanwhile, Emily at The Book Eater has interviewed me and I’m trully honoured. This is my first interview, so, be sure to check Emily’s and explore her wonderful blog. Also, Risa has given me the opportunity to interview her on some postcolonial issues. I came up with the idea after reading…

  • Postcolonial

    Postcolonialism and Literature – Reading the others. Small Island’s review

    Small Island by Andrea Lévy is part of my Caribbean Literature course this year along with Merle Hodge’s Crick, Crack Monkey. When I first went to the library, Small Island was the most appealing (despite its length) and I decided to give it a try first. Title: Small Island Author: Andrea Lévy Year of Publication: 2004 Pages: 560 Genre: narrative postcolonial/bestseller BBC Adaptation: 2009. By John Alexander, with Naomie Harris, Ruth Wilson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ashley Walters and David Oyelowo 3.75/5 Summary, from Book Depository: It is 1948, and England is recovering from a war. But at 21 Nevern Street, London, the conflict has only just begun. Queenie Bligh’s neighbours do…