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  • Poetry

    Anorexic by Eavan Boland

    I am not a huge fan of poetry and I do not really know why. I guess I tend to read novels since I still have to find crime-fiction- poems. Or maybe I should write some myself. Anyway, I have this professor who loves poetry and every time I attend her lessons I wonder why I find it so hard to read poetry when it is so inspiring. Yesterday, we analyzed this poem with her and I fell instantly in love with it. I do not want to write the analysis here, but just its context so that you interpret it yourself and see what it means to you. Eavan…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction,  Poetry

    Feminist Sundays

    Hi, everyone, and welcome back to Feminist Sundays! Please leave a link to your wonderful posts on the comments section so that we can all pay you a visit. Thank you 🙂 Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. The idea for this project started when I was reading a book about female philosophers and I realised my total…

  • Poetry

    Poem: Lady Weeping at the Crossroads

    I must admit I am not the biggest poetry fan. But, ironically, I love music! For me, it is much easier to connect to a message when sung, with music reflecting the singer’s interpretation of the meaning. And talking of music and poetry, yesterday I remembered Carla Bruni and her album No Promises. There, the Italo-French singer adds music to her favourite English poems. My favourite piece of the whole album is Lady Weeping at the Crossroads, a poem from 1940 by W.H Auden full of sadness but, somehow, hope. I think the woman in the poem feels lost but, at the same time, it makes the world hers: there…

  • Poetry

    Poem: When we Two Parted by Lord Byron

    Today, in my 19th century literature lesson we read the following poem by Lord Byron and I inmediately fell in love with it. I have a soft spot for certain romantic poems (not any by Cooleridge or Wordsworth) because they appeal very directly to the reader’s feelings. This creates a unique bond between the reader and the author: once again, literature proves ist universality and its power to unite human beings across time and space. Here is the poem: When we Two Parted When we two parted In silence and tears, Half broken-hearted To sever for years, Pale grew thy cheek and cold, Colder thy kiss; Truly that hour foretold…

  • General Fiction,  Poetry

    The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

    The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer was a compulsory reading for a monographic course on the author. I wasn’t very attracted to the idea at first but I quickly changed my mind. 3/5 Basically, The Canterbury Tales is the transcription of the tales of a group of pilgrims competing for a prize: a soup. It is very important to highlight that it is a transcription and it has a lot of oral features, like interruptions. However, most of the tales rhyme and it is difficult to actually imagine someone speaking like that (even in the 14th century!). Our professor selected some tales for us to read, amounting to 20 in…

  • Poetry,  Postcolonial

    Poem: A Far Cry from Africa by Derek Walcott

    Just recently I did a series on postcolonialism and did not include a wonderful author I did not know yet: Derek Walcott. He is a West Indian with mixed ancestry: two of his grandparents were black and two were white. Being superficial, the result could not be better: he got both blue eyes and dark skin. But, leaving superficial comments besides, his mixed ancestry has also influenced his work as an artist (a decision he took being a kid). However, reading one of his poems, I also found he is very influenced by the sea and the fluidity. This last concept of fluidity is very important in postcolonial theory: we…

  • Poetry

    Troilus and Criseyde by Geoffrey Chaucer

    I’ve always considered myself a narrative girl since poetry was never an option. But, things are changing this year because thanks to my Chaucer and Caribbean Literature courses, I am beginning to enjoy poetry. To tell you the truth, I could not be happier! Summary from Book Depository: ‘Now listen with good will, as I go straight to my subject matter, in which you may hear the double sorrows of Troilus in his love for Criseyde, and how she forsook him before she died’ Like Romeo and Juliet, or Tristan and Iseult, the names of Troilus and Criseyde will always be united: a pair of lovers whose names are inseparable…

  • Poetry,  Postcolonial

    Poem: Prison by Mutabaruka

    It has just been published that Mubarak has renounced. So, in honour of those who have fought for the liberty of the whole country: Prisoner by: Mutabaruka You ask me if I have ever been to prison Been to Prison? Your world of murderer’s and thieves Of hatred and jealousy of death And you ask me if I have ever been to prison I answer, Yes I am still there trying to escape. I don’t usually like poetry, but this is one of my favourite pieces. It is simple, direct and yet it describes the struggle of many people against an oppresive power. Mutabaruka is a Rastafarian, social poet belonging…