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  • Forensics. The Anatomy of Crime by Val McDermid
    Medical Humanities,  Non-fiction

    Forensics by Val McDermid

    Forensics (2015) by Val McDermid is a non-fiction book, and the official companion to the Wellcome Trust’s exhibition with the same name, that runs from January until June 2015. Because of the theme of this blog, and my PhD, fellow crime fiction academic Mrs.P encouraged me to pay my first visit to London to see the exhibition. After much thinking and planning, I made it to the City a month ago, and what can I say? I fell in love with it. Reading Forensics has been one of the most pleasurable readings of 2015. I had been trying to get back to my normal reading for some months, and this…

  • Non-fiction

    Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

    Just of lately I have been very keen on non-fiction, which is a huge change taking into account I am usually all for a good crime novel. But I think my brain has switched to theory and non-fiction reading for the day, so it is a little bit difficult to switch off for the night. So, basically I looked at my TBR pile and realized that I had long wanted to read Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, a book I was kindly sent by Little Brown to review. My pleasure! From Goodreads: In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a…

  • Non-fiction

    Bodies by Susie Orbach

    PhD is keeping me über-busy, but I have to admit I have never been this happy. However, my reading time has been cut to a quarter of what it was two months ago, and I’m struggling to find the will to read in my free time when I have spent the day reading and writing about my PhD, which is also on crime fiction. So, where does my personal reading stop and where does professional reading start? That could fill a post, so let’s leave it for now. But ,what I did notice is that I am in a mood for non-fiction, probably because I spent most of the day…

  • Non-fiction

    The Creation of Patriarchy by Gerda Lerner

    I chose to review The Creation of Patriarchy (1986) by Gerda Lerner as part of a course on women’s history and I could not be happier with my choice. Yesterday I did a quick profile on Lerner as part of my Feminist Sundays meme – click here to read it – so, it was only natural that today I reviewed the first book I finished in 2014. From GoodReads: A major new work by a leading historian and pioneer in women’s studies, The Creation of Patriarchy is a radical reconceptualization of Western civilization that makes gender central to its analysis. Gerda Lerner argues that male dominance over women is not…

  • Non-fiction

    A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

    A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf has been on my mind for a long time now and for 11 months on my TBR pile (thanks to Mr B&R). The work – first speech and then essay – is a landmark in feminist theory and it has been showing up in every task on my Master’s Degree since it began last November. So, Leah from Books Speak Volumes and I decided to do a read-along in October. You can check her review here. From Goodreads: A Room of One’s Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a…

  • Non-fiction

    Stumbling on Happiness by Daniel Gilbert

    I came across Stumbling on Happiness by Daniel Gilbert some years ago while I browsed Sadie’s blog and I bookmarked the review because I knew there would be a time when I would need such a reading. The time came this August when I craved for some non-fiction and, after graduating last June, kept wondering how things change and how we are changed by them. From GoodReads: Why are lovers quicker to forgive their partners for infidelity than for leaving dirty dishes in the sink?• Why will sighted people pay more to avoid going blind than blind people will pay to regain their sight? • Why do dining companions insist…

  • Non-fiction

    Confessions of a Sociopath by M.E Thomas

    Confessions of a Sociopath by M.E Thomas is a non-fiction work about an American woman who suffers from sociopathy, also known as “antisocial personality disorder” nowadays. I first caught a glimpse of the book on The Book Depository Home page and contacted the publisher who kindly sent me a review copy. From Good Reads: The first memoir of its kind, Confessions of a Sociopath is an engrossing, highly captivating narrative of the author’s life as a diagnosed sociopath. She is a charismatic charmer, an ambitious self-promoter, and a cunning and calculating liar. She can induce you to invest in her financial schemes, vote for her causes, and even join her…

  • Non-fiction

    Flappers: Six Women of a Dangerous Generation by Judith Mackrell

    Some weeks ago I contacted Philippa McEwan from Pan MacMillan asking for a review copy of Confessions of a Sociopath. She kindly directed me to the colleague who was in charge of that book but, seeing as I was interested in the 1920’s and women’s representation offered me a review copy of Flappers: Six Women of a Dangerous Generation by Judith Mackrell and I very gladly accepted it. From GoodReads: Glamorized, mythologized and demonized – the women of the 1920s prefigured the 1960s in their determination to reinvent the way they lived. Flappers is in part a biography of that restless generation: starting with its first fashionable acts of rebellion just…

  • Non-fiction

    Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler

    Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler was published in March 2013 by St. Martin Press. As soon as I heard of the book I knew I needed to read it: I felt Zelda has been historically underestimated and usually labelled as “Fitzgerald’s crazy wife”. But madness is culturally constructed and I knew there was something more to Zelda’s breakdowns and I wanted to see if others thought the same way. Luckily, Fowler did. Thanks to Lisa for sending me a review copy. From Goodreads: When beautiful, reckless Southern belle Zelda Sayre meets F. Scott Fitzgerald at a country club dance in 1918, she is seventeen years…