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  • American,  Crime fiction,  Random,  Southern

    The Weight of Lies by Emily Carpenter

    When you are in a Southern crime fiction mood you just have to roll with it! After compiling some nice looking Southern mysteries last month I had no other option but to read Emily Carpenter’s The Weight of Lies. The novel came to my attention after a good friend swore it was the perfect reading when you are in a Gillian Flynn hangover – yes, that’s a thing – and I have to say, she was 100% right. The Weight of Lies by Emily Carpenter is a fast-paced mystery that tells the story of Meg Ashley, daughter to Frances Ashley, a best-selling author idolised by her 1970’s cult horror novel Kitten. Frances’ success…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    Unbecoming by Rebecca Scherm

    I was offered a review copy of Rebbeca Scherm’s novel Unbecoming by Annie Harris, from Viking. At first, I spent a few days thinking whether this was the kind of novel that I would like, but Annie always offers me books that I love, plus, the book was to be released on my birthday. So, I accepted, and I got an advanced review copy of one of the best, most complex and more life-changing novels I have ever read. Buy at BookDepository ‘Just-be-yourself had its limits. She adapted to his vision. She liked that girl more than she had ever liked herself before anyway, so that was the self she…

  • Crime fiction,  Southern,  TV/Movies

    True Detective by Nic Pizzolatto

    The following is a spoiler-free review of True Detective. Enjoy! Some time in early spring my Facebook wall got a lot of “you have to watch True Detective” messages, all of them coming from people I trust and who know my tastes pretty well. Mr. B&R insisted as much, saying it was really good and I would love it. So, during my Spring Break, I thought I should watch it, totally aware that if it were as good as everyone said, I would have the time to just stay at home and watch as many episodes a day as I would love. Turned out my timing worked amazingly: no one…

  • Author Interviews,  Features,  Southern

    Exclusive Interview: Ann Weisgarber

    I met Ann Weisgarber some nine months ago when I requested Sophie from Mantle an ARC of her latest novel, The Promise. After that, we started talking on Twitter and she even let me interview her. Now that I’ve already reviewed The Personal History of Rachel DuPree – her debut novel – I had some questions to ask and she kindly accepted to our second interview. One of the things you must know about our friendship is that I always feel I can ask her any question and she’ll answer it. Regarding this interview, I was particularly nervous about the first one, but Ann as lovely as usual, provided me…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    The Personal History of Rachel DuPree by Ann Weisgarber

    The Personal History of Rachel DuPree by Ann Weisgarber was originally published in 2009 when it was also shortlisted for the Orange Award for New Writers. I first knew of Ann Weisgarber due to the publication of her latest novel The Promise – first review ever published here! – and since then we have remained in touch. When The Promise came out last March, I wanted to review her other novel and was kindly sent a paperback edition by Sophie from Mantle. From Goodreads: When Rachel, hired help in a Chicago boardinghouse, falls in love with Isaac, the boardinghouse owner’s son, he makes her a bargain: he’ll marry her, but…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    The Promise by Ann Weisgarber

    I first heard of The Promise by Ann Weisgarber* on Twitter, on a chat between a fellow blogger and good friend now, working for Pan McMillan. And it was instant love: as I saw the cover I knew I wanted, I needed, to read that book. A free review copy arrived some days after I contacted the publisher and, somehow, the book seemed the perfect work to ease me back on a reading routine. The picture of a little boy, unknown to me then, but a beloved one now, stared at me from the top of my TBR pile on my desk, near my reading lamp. It caught my sight…

  • 20th century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty

    Some years ago I decided my thing was Southern literature. I had never read anything by a Southern author, but the setting and the history were interesting enough to me to take for granted I would love Southern literature. After some research, I decided Eudora Welty (whose work as a photographer produced the image on the banner) was the perfect author to start reading about the South, from a Southern perspective. My choice was The Optimist’s Daughter. I structure this review because I did not want to leave anything important behind. Buy at Book Depository: The people of Mount Salus, Mississippi always felt good about Judge McKelva. He was a…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    The Help by Kathryn Stockett

    I got a bookmarker announcing this book quite a while ago, but the title was in Spanish and it was not really appealing (something like Maids and Ladies) and the cover did not help (a dish full of cookies). But after some research I came across the following cover and the original tittle and I could not help but feel instantely attracted to the book. 4/5 Set in the 1950’s  Jackson, Mississippi, The Help deals with the lives of three very different women (Aibileen, Minny, and Skeeter ) at a time when changes were threatening the “old values” people thought, ruled the world. However, Jackson does not seem able to…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction,  Southern

    The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    The Awakening is an American novel published in 1899 in which the author, Kate Chopin, demands independence for women at a time when they were obliged to be both mothers and wives. 4.5/5 Edna Pontellier is a 29-year, high-class old Southern beauty with a perfect life that even includes a couple of houses in which she can have a break from her stressful life. But, while vacationing in Le Grand Isle with her fellow creole neighbours, she makes friends with the hotel’s owner’s son, Robert Lebrun. Although at the beginning Edna is not conscious about the real meaning of their relationship, it is when Robert decides to move to Mexico…