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  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Muse by Jessie Burton

    Author Jessie Burton became an international sensation when her first novel The Miniaturist became a best-seller across Europe. Back then my Twitter feed was full of praise for Burton and her debut novel. However, the story did not appeal to me at all, and after discussing this with other bloggers I decided I did not have to read a book just because everyone loved it. When Burton’s next novel The Muse came out last June I knew it was the right time to discover the author everyone loves. Thanks to Picador for the review copy. The Muse tells two different stories, both with women as main characters. In 1967 Odelle…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    Shame by Melanie Finn

    When I read a quote from Shame by Melanie Finn on Elizabeth Preston’s and Simon Savidge‘s Twitter feeds, I knew I had to get my hands on it. After some research I found out that the book had been published last year and that the team behind it thought it was one of the best things they had ever published. Thanks to Weidenfeld & Nicholson for the review copy. The first pages of Shame describe how the main character, Pilgrim Jones, sees a small gesture between her husband and an unknown woman in a meeting in Switzerland. It was something small, maybe a smile, maybe the way they were too…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Ages of Lulu (1989) by Almudena Grandes

    Even though I am Spanish, I am not the biggest fan of Spanish literature. In fact, it is very seldom that I pick up a book either written by a Spanish author or translated into Spanish. However, last March I enrolled on a course about ‘Women in Literature’ that ended up being ‘Women in Spanish Literature’. Some of the authors rang a bell while others I knew: it is one of those times when you know the names and the titles of their works, but you have never read any of the novels. It was with this frame of mind that I realised I had to read The Ages of…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    Modern Lovers by Emma Straub

    I heard of Emma Straub’s new book Modern Lovers – to be released by Michael Joseph on the 30th of June 2016 in the UK – thanks to Book Rioter and vlogger Wallace Yovetich. If you do now know who she is, then here is the video that made me request a review copy of Modern Lovers (thanks to Penguin Random House): Also, shortly after I started reading the book I mentioned it on Twitter and fellow bloggers like Noami from The Writes of Woman said they had loved Straub’s previous novel The Vacationers – you can read her review here. That is when I was a hundred per cent…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    Not Working by Lisa Owens

    I knew I had to get my hands on Lisa Owen’s novel Not Working when I saw it described as representative of the Millennial experience at MarinaSofia’s blog. As a Millennial I could not resist the opportunity to check a funny take on what it means to be one of the most self-centered generations in literature (so, yes, this post is very much an exploration of myself as it is a review). Thank you to the lovely people at Picador who kindly sent me a hardback review copy. It is gorgeous. Not Working tells the story of Claire Flannery who, in her late twenties,  decides to quit her job at…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Girls by Emma Cline

    Last month I found out that almost everyone on my Twitter timeline was talking about a book called The Girls by Emma Cline, and it was not only my fellow and trusted bloggers, but non-literary vloggers as well, such as Lex. I did some research online and when I found out what the book was about I knew I had to get my hands on a review copy as soon as possible before Penguin Random House ran out of them in the summer. The Girls tells the story of Evie from two moments in her life: the present, and the 1969 fateful summer in California when she first saw Suzanne.…

  • 21st Century,  Essays,  Medical Humanities

    Why Patricia Cornwell is One of the Best Crime Fiction Writers (And Why You Should Be Reading Her Works)

    ‘Hi! My name is Elena and I’m writing a Humanities doctoral thesis. On Contemporary Literature. On crime fiction. On Patricia Cornwell’s books’. That is how much it takes me these days to get a look of embarrassment from many people, although luckily not my beloved ones. Not only am I pursuing a PhD in Humanities, which apparently is not nearly as important as my expected Medicine career (on which acquaintances gave up a long time ago), but I am also studying bad literature. Airport literature. Beach readings. Pop-corn crime fiction. Best-sellers. You name it. I have chosen the wrong path. Or so they say. Because, how can you build your…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    The Ecliptic by Benjamin Wood

    Both Anna James and Elizabeth Preston gushed about Benjamin Wood’s second novel, The Ecliptic over Twitter this summer. So, I asked Elizabeth for a review copy, and she kindly sent me one as soon as possible – thank you! The first thing that caught my attention was that Benjamin Wood is a young British writer that I had not heard about. I am always interested in finding new, fresh voices in fiction, and I did not hesitate once to read his second novel. I was also interested in broadening my reading, because while some people read too many men authors, I tend to read mainly feminist women writers. The Ecliptic…

  • OnlyEverYours Review
    21st Century,  General Fiction

    Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill

    I first learned about Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill on Twitter, when it was described as “Mean Girls meets The Handmaid’s Tale“. I love Mean Girls, and I have not read The Handmaid’s Tale yet, but I love everything Atwood writes, and I am sure her masterpiece is no exception. So I requested a review copy, and Alainna Hadjigeorgiou at Quercus books made sure I got one within the week. Only Ever Yours is a dystopian, feminist novel. I am not shocked at all that many people have compared it to Atwood’s fiction. O’Neill herself read English at Trinity College in Dublin, admiting that “I was always drawn to…

  • 21st Century,  General Fiction

    Atonement by Ian McEwan

    I have long wanted to watch Atonement, which I tried once a few years ago, and then gave up on minute four. Because, if a film is that good, how is the novel it is based on supposed to be? Well, Ian McEwan’s most famous work is the masterpiece that I thought, and even more. It wasn’t only wickedness and scheming that made people unhappy, it was confusion and misunderstanding; above all, it was the failure to grasp the simple truth that other people are as real as you Atonement tells the story of Briony Tallis, her older sister, Cecily Tallis, and the family long-time friend, Robbie Turner in 1935…