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  • 19th century,  General Fiction

    Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell

    Ruth (1853) is a novel by English writer Elizabeth Gaskell, author of the well-known Cranford. I first learned about Ruth while doing project for my 19th century literature lessons a few years ago and although I started reading it, I never finished it. So, when I got a case for my e-reader last Christmas and I could finally take it off the house without fear of having it broken, I decided to return to Ruth. From Goodreads: Ruth Hilton is an orphaned young seamstress who catches the eye of a gentleman, Henry Bellingham, who is captivated by her simplicity and beauty. When she loses her job and home, he offers…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction,  Poetry

    Feminist Sundays

    Hi, everyone, and welcome back to Feminist Sundays! Please leave a link to your wonderful posts on the comments section so that we can all pay you a visit. Thank you 🙂 Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. The idea for this project started when I was reading a book about female philosophers and I realised my total…

  • 19th century,  Feminist Sundays,  General Fiction

    Feminist Sundays: Elizabeth Gaskell

    Happy 1st of December! I’m back with yet another Feminist Sunday 🙂 Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and women’s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep in mind that everyone is entitled to their own opinion, although healthy discussion is encouraged. Today I’ll be presenting you a personal favourite of mine and my readers: 19th century English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. You can read a more extensive biography and study of her main works here. But today I will give you a…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction

    What Maisie Knew by Henry James

    What Maisie Knew by Henry James was first published in 1897 and just recently turned into a movie starring the lovely Julianne Moore. I was offered a review copy by Penguin and I accepted: it was the first time a publisher had offered me a re-print of a classic, so thank you! From GoodReads: What Maisie Knew represents one of James’s finest reflections on the rites of passage from wonder to knowledge, and the question of their finality. The child of violently divorced parents, Maisie Farange opens her eyes on a distinctly modern world. I think GoodRead’s description is short yet accurate and I would not advise future readers to…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction

    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

    Anna Karenina has been on my TBR list for a long time, so when Mr. B&R bought me this amazing Penguin tie-in edition for Christmas, I was delighted. For some reason I find myself drawn to books with female character titles because they usually tell the woman’s story. But Anna Karenina was not exactly what I expected. From GoodReads: Leo Tolstoy’s classic story of doomed love is one of the most admired novels in world literature. Generations of readers have been enthralled by his magnificent heroine, the unhappily married Anna Karenina, and her tragic affair with dashing Count Vronsky. In their world frivolous liaisons are commonplace, but Anna and Vronsky’s…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction,  Short stories

    The Birthmark by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The Birthmark is a short story by nineteen century-American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne, best known for his novel The Scarlett Letter. I came across the short story in my 19th century American literature lessons and it has long remained with me although I actually never wrote a review. When I talked about it on my Suggested Halloween Readings post, some of you expressed interest on the story and I thought this would be the perfect time of the year to review it. So, first of all, The Birthmark is a short story that can be easily read in one sitting. It tells the story of Aylmer, a scientific married to  gorgeous…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction,  Random

    Suggested Halloween Readings

    I think I’m not alone when it comes to themed readings and this month, it’s Halloween! I have been thinking of what I’d like to read and what I’d suggest if anyone asked me, so, I combined it with my passion for lists and decided it was time to write this post. Books I’d love to read for Halloween: 1. Dolly by Susan Hill I loved The Woman in Black and I’m dying to read her new book! I read it in two sittings and it scared the dead out of me. The atmosphere is eerie ala Rebecca. We spend the book asking ourselves: What are we really scared of?…

  • 19th century,  General Fiction

    Emma

    2012 meant my re-discovery of Jane Austen. At first, I had a really bad experience with Pride and Prejudice, but everything changed when I read Mansfield Park. I really liked that the love story came as secondary in my reading and that a sense of coziness invaded me. While reading it, I longed for long walks in the sun, infinite time for reading, no responsibilities (nothing beyond making my bed every morning) and bread with butter and tea at four. The characters were interesting and the love story was fine, but it was not what made me revise my love for Jane Austen. Now I am facing my finals, the…