Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell

Ruth (1853) is a novel by English writer Elizabeth Gaskell, author of the well-known Cranford. I first learned about Ruth while doing project for my 19th century literature lessons a few years ago and although I started reading it, I never finished it. So, when I got a case for my e-reader last Christmas and […]

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Feminist Sundays

Hi, everyone, and welcome back to Feminist Sundays! Please leave a link to your wonderful posts on the comments section so that we can all pay you a visit. Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚ Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to […]

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Feminist Sundays: Elizabeth Gaskell

Happy 1st of December! I’m back with yet another Feminist Sunday ๐Ÿ™‚ Feminist Sundays is a weekly meme created at Books and Reviews. The aim is simply to have a place and a time to talk about feminism and womenโ€™s issues. This is a place of tolerance, creativity, discussion, criticism and praise. Remember to keep […]

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What Maisie Knew by Henry James

What Maisie Knew by Henry James was first published in 1897 and just recently turned into a movie starring the lovely Julianne Moore. I was offered a review copy by Penguin and I accepted: it was the first time a publisher had offered me a re-print of a classic, so thank you! From GoodReads: What […]

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Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Anna Karenina has been on my TBR list for a long time, so when Mr. B&R bought me this amazing Penguin tie-in edition for Christmas, I was delighted. For some reason I find myself drawn to books with female character titles because they usually tell the woman’s story. But Anna Karenina was not exactly what […]

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Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

An analitic review of Little Women (1868) by Louisa May Alcott – Penguin Classic Edition with an introduction by feminist literary critic Elaine Showalter. Contains spoilers and quotes.

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Gift Ideas 2012: Final Post

Final Post on the Books and Reviews’ Gift Series 2012. An exploration of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay “Gifts” (1844).

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The Birthmark by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Birthmark is a short story by nineteen century-American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne, best known for his novel The Scarlett Letter. I came across the short story in my 19th century American literature lessons and it has long remained with me although I actually never wrote a review. When I talked about it on my Suggested […]

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Suggested Halloween Readings

I think I’m not alone when it comes to themed readings and this month, it’s Halloween! I have been thinking of what I’d like to read and what I’d suggest if anyone asked me, so, I combined it with my passion for lists and decided it was time to write this post. Books I’d love […]

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Emma

2012 meant my re-discovery of Jane Austen. At first, I had a really bad experience with Pride and Prejudice, but everything changed when I read Mansfield Park. I really liked that the love story came as secondary in my reading and that a sense of coziness invaded me. While reading it, I longed for long […]

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