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  • British,  Crime fiction

    This is How It Ends by Eva Dolan

    British author Eva Dolan has been on the radar for readers of high-quality and socially conscious crime fiction for some years now. Her Zigic and Ferreira series became known for targeting bones of contention in contemporary society, such as racism, human trafficking, and disability. In the past year, she has been working on a stand-alone novel, This is How it Ends (out Raven Press, 25th January 2018), and I was lucky to have one of the early review copies sent to me. The premise of This is How it Ends is really good: Young Ella Riordan has joined the protest groups in London trying to fight gentrification and the expulsion…

  • Crime fiction,  Short stories

    Bodies in the Library Recommends: Crime Fiction Short Stories

    Short stories have been experiencing a comeback for some time now, but it was at the end of last year when The New Yorker‘s “Cat Person” became one of the most read literary texts on the Internet that we all had to agree: Short stories are genius. As a reader of crime fiction, criminal short stories represent one of the most successful times in the history of literature for the genre, with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes short stories leading the way, and closely followed by Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple. So, as I read all the blurb about “Cat Person” and the outpour of love for short stories that…

  • Crime fiction,  Nordic Noir

    The Snowman by Jo Nesbo

    I decided to read The Snowman by Jo Nesbø (2007) after I realised the film adaptation was about to come out and it would be perfect for a dark, rainy Saturday evening. Two things happened that will surprise no bookworm: Everyone told me the film was horribly made (apparently something to do with reshootings), and I loved the book. Since I am having some serious trouble finding space for new books and I am an avid public library user I borrowed the Spanish translation from my public library with the blessing of the librarian, who has known me since I was 3. She said I would love it, and as…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    A Deadly Thaw by Sarah Ward

    A Deadly Thaw by Sarah Ward is the second installment in the critically acclaimed DC Connie Child series. The first novel In Bitter Chill was a strong procedural with a unique British feel to it, so when saw the novel being sold at Crimefest17 – where I saw also to meet with Sarah again – I immediately bought a copy to have it signed. I knew I was in for a treat, so I save the book until the perfect moment to enjoy it. But I did not really know what I had been waiting for. DC Connie Childs and her colleagues will face one of the most challenging cases…

  • Crime fiction,  Domestic Noir,  International

    The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena

    The Couple Next Door has been on radar for quite some time now, especially since the summer when I downloaded the audiobook. However, I never got to listen to it, so when I found the Spanish translation at my local library I decided to give it a try. I don’t often read translations from English, as I would rather read the book in the original, but I am also a believer in supporting local libraries by using them. It also helped that my librarian said I would enjoy the book, and I would read it in a few sittings. As usual, she was right – librarians’ wisdom! The Couple Next…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty

    Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty made a stellar appearance on my Twitter timeline upon the release of its television adaptation by BBC One in January 2017. Some people loved it, some people hated it, but everyone kept talking about the book. That was the moment when I knew I had to read it, so I checked with one my PhD supervisor to see whether she had a copy, as the story is very much up her alley. She did not, but she was so impressed by the novel that she bought at copy and kindly let me borrow it over the summer. The main premise of Apple Tree Yard…

  • Crime fiction,  Nordic Noir

    The Crow Girl by Erik Axl Sund

    I was sent a review copy of Erik Axl Sund’s The Crow Girl upon its paperback release in the UK. I had previously heard about the novel because everyone whose taste in books I trusted was reading, and loving it. I also saw another delegate at Captivating Criminality 4 Conference reading it, and the bookish nosy that I am made me disturb his reading to ask for the book. He was loving it too. So, with all positive recommendations coming my way, I had no doubts that The Crow Girl – with its dark and twisted plot masterfully translated from the original Swedish by Neil Smith – was one of…

  • Crime fiction,  Nordic Noir

    The Bird Tribunal by Agnes Ravatn

    The Bird Tribunal by Agnes Ravatn was one of the most acclaimed crime fiction released of last year. Every critic, blogger, and crime fiction fan that I knew and followed on Twitter seemed to be reading this book, so I kindly requested a review copy to Orenda Books and I got it. It has taken me more than a year to get to read this jewel, but it was completely worth it. The Bird Tribunal was the winner of the English Pen Award and its English translation comes ten years after its debut in Norway. Exquisitely translated by Rosie Hedger, this Nordic Noir hit is the perfect fall and winter…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

    Ruth Ware became an instant best-selling author when her debut crime novel In a Dark, Dark Wood came out in 2015. Since then, she has also published The Woman in Cabin 10, and the film rights to her first novel have been acquired by Reese Witherspoon. Ware’s latest novel The Lying Game came out this summer, and I was lucky to have been sent a review copy by Harvill Secker while I was away in England. The Lying Game starts with Isa, a new mom to baby Freya, who leaves her settled and middle-class life in London as soon as she gets a text messsage saying ‘I need you’. The…

  • Crime fiction,  Domestic Noir

    Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

    Liane Moriarty’s latest novel Truly Madly Guilty came out last summer and I was kindly sent an early review copy by the publishers. But being a fan of Moriarty – you can check my reviews of her previous novels here – I knew I was in for a treat and I wanted to make sure I had free time to sit and devour the book. When I finally took a month off this summer (better later than never, eh?) I knew that one of the books I would enjoy the most in the pile of selected readings would be Moriarty’s. Turns out, I did not know what I had waiting…