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  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    First Time Reading a Classic: And Then There Were None (1939) by Agatha Christie

    Confession time: I had never read or watched any adaptations of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None (1939) by Agatha Christie. Except for the Family Guy double episode, Psych‘s and the many other references in popular culture and media that I have watched. But, the original? Nope, never. It does not help that we have kept a literal translation of the original title Ten LIttle Niggers  in Spanish – click here to see it – and when I looked for an English second-hand review copy on Abebooks, I could find none. But, after some failed attempts, and some research, I found the original title, and after last Christmas’ super…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    Still Missing by Beth Gutcheon (Persephone Books)

    Despite my love for feminist literature and women writers, I had never bought a Persephone Book. In case you do not know about them, Persephone Books ‘reprints neglected fiction and non-fiction by mid-twentieth century (mostly) women writers.’ You can check their catalogue here, or do like I did and follow them on Twitter. Back in September I wondered if they had some review copies available of crime fiction writers, and they kindly sent me Still Missing (1981) by Beth Gutcheon. Buy from Persephone Books  // Buy at Book Depository ‘You could hardly get to age thirty-four without learning something about loss. By thirty four you’re bound to have lost your…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    From Doon with Death by Ruth Rendell

    Last November I was feeling quite disappointed with my PhD reading, basically because I kept reading theories and analysis of classic crime fiction novels that I had never read. So, I emailed by every lovely professor to talk about my frustration and she said of course I could take a break and read two of the most important women authors in 20th century crime fiction: P.D James and Ruth Rendell. You can check my review of An Unsuitable Job for a Woman here, but today, I’m all about Rendell’s first novel in the Wexford series, From Doon with Death. I got this book from the publishers, since they were re-printing…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    An Unsuitable Job for a Woman by P.D James

    Back in September I bought three books for my PhD because I knew they were landmarks in crime fiction and I could not allow myself to start writing about female investigators without having read those classics. One of them was An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1972) by P.D James: From Goodreads: Handsome Cambridge dropout Mark Callender died hanging by the neck with a faint trace of lipstick on his mouth. When the official verdict is suicide, his wealthy father hires fledgling private investigator Cordelia Gray to find out what led him to self-destruction. What she discovers instead is a twisting trail of secrets and sins, and the strong scent…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers

    I have spent the last two weeks reading Murder by the Book by Sally Munt, a book published in the 90’s exploring feminist crime fiction. As you can imagine, there are constant references to classics, so I saw myself stopping my study routine to read two wonderful crime fiction classics that had been on my to-be-read list for quite a long time: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie and Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers. From Goodreads: Mystery novelist Harriet Vane knew all about poisons, and when her fiancé died in the manner prescribed in one of her books, a jury of her peers had a hangman’s noose…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

    Last week I started reading for my PhD and one of the books mentioned and explored Agatha Christie’s classic The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. Now, I have to confess I am not a big Golden Age fan regarding crime fiction, so, no, I had never read Roger Ackroyd, but I knew I had to. It is usually referred to as Christie’s most surprising work. I have to say, not so much. The following review contains spoilers. Buy at Book Depository: In the village of King’s Abbot, a widow’s sudden suicide sparks rumors that she murdered her first husband, was being blackmailed, and was carrying on a secret affair with the…

  • Classics,  Crime fiction

    The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

    This a post for Sadie-Jean because she owns one of the best novels of English Literature and she hasn’t read it yet! And also because I cannot wait to discuss this novel with her. The Woman in White, a victorian work by English writer Wilkie Collins, is considered the first detective novel of a period full of other famous characters such as Sherlock Holmes and Mr. Watson. When Walter Hartright gets a job as a drawing teacher at the Fairlie’s he would have never imagined he would meet  two fo the most important people in his life. Laura Fairlie is the typical victorian lady: squeamish and very sensitive, she is…