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  • British,  Crime fiction,  Random

    Review: The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton (Raven Books, 8th February 2018) quickly became one of last Winter’s most anticipated books. I saw my Twitter feed flooded with people praising the book and once I learned that it was a modern take on a Golden Age mystery, I knew I had to get my hands on a copy. Thank you to Raven Books (Bloomsbury) for always supporting Bodies at the Library. The first thing that called my attention about The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle was that it was described as a modern take on a Golden Age mystery with a twist. I think it’s pretty obvious now that…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Read Come and Find Me (Marnie Rome #5) by Sarah Hilary for Free at The Pigeonhole!

    As many of you know I LOVE the Marnie Rome series by Sarah Hilary. I have been reading the series for years now, I have even met Sarah and fangirled about how much I love Marnie. The series is thrilling, show a perfect combination of procedural and a traumatic personal story from a complex and inspiring main character. More importantly, the novels have been pioneers in the #readdiverse movement in crime fiction as they feature Noah Jake, a descendant of Jamaican immigrants and the first black and openly homosexual detectives in contemporary British crime fiction. Seriously, I can’t recommend the Marnie Rome novels enough. Now you can too read Come…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    This is How It Ends by Eva Dolan

    British author Eva Dolan has been on the radar for readers of high-quality and socially conscious crime fiction for some years now. Her Zigic and Ferreira series became known for targeting bones of contention in contemporary society, such as racism, human trafficking, and disability. In the past year, she has been working on a stand-alone novel, This is How it Ends (out Raven Press, 25th January 2018), and I was lucky to have one of the early review copies sent to me. The premise of This is How it Ends is really good: Young Ella Riordan has joined the protest groups in London trying to fight gentrification and the expulsion…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    A Deadly Thaw by Sarah Ward

    A Deadly Thaw by Sarah Ward is the second installment in the critically acclaimed DC Connie Child series. The first novel In Bitter Chill was a strong procedural with a unique British feel to it, so when saw the novel being sold at Crimefest17 – where I saw also to meet with Sarah again – I immediately bought a copy to have it signed. I knew I was in for a treat, so I save the book until the perfect moment to enjoy it. But I did not really know what I had been waiting for. DC Connie Childs and her colleagues will face one of the most challenging cases…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty

    Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty made a stellar appearance on my Twitter timeline upon the release of its television adaptation by BBC One in January 2017. Some people loved it, some people hated it, but everyone kept talking about the book. That was the moment when I knew I had to read it, so I checked with one my PhD supervisor to see whether she had a copy, as the story is very much up her alley. She did not, but she was so impressed by the novel that she bought at copy and kindly let me borrow it over the summer. The main premise of Apple Tree Yard…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

    Ruth Ware became an instant best-selling author when her debut crime novel In a Dark, Dark Wood came out in 2015. Since then, she has also published The Woman in Cabin 10, and the film rights to her first novel have been acquired by Reese Witherspoon. Ware’s latest novel The Lying Game came out this summer, and I was lucky to have been sent a review copy by Harvill Secker while I was away in England. The Lying Game starts with Isa, a new mom to baby Freya, who leaves her settled and middle-class life in London as soon as she gets a text messsage saying ‘I need you’. The…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Quieter than Killing (Marnie Rome #4) by Sarah Hilary

    Sarah Hilary is back with another instalment in the acclaimed Marnie Rome series. If you have followed this blog for some time, you will know that I am a great fan of the series, but also of Sarah, who I met at CrimeFest15 and who is always open to discuss feminism, and women’s crime fiction with me. No wonder she is an active member of Killer Women, a wonderful organisation that aims to bring together women in crime fiction. Now that I live in England, I was lucky to borrow her latest book from the Public Library (more on my love for British public libraries soon). Quieter than Killing take…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    He’s Gone by Alex Clare

    Last January’s Women’s March events all over the world raised a lot of questions about who had a right to participate, and why. The concept of “woman” has been destabilised and questioned since Simone De Beauvoir announced to the world that one becomes a woman, rather than being born one. In fact, postmodern theorists like Judith Butler have denied the existence of a subject that exists under the label ‘woman’, and instead advocates for a more diverse take on womanhood that breaks away with society’s traditional constructions and expectations.  He’s Gone explores this postmodern postulate by having a trans-woman detective as a main character. Meet Robyn Bailley, DI of the…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    Flashbacks by J.E Hall

    I borrowed Flashbacks by J.E Hall from a friend from university who, knowing of my passion for crime fiction, thought I would enjoy a thriller by a local author that she is familiar with. Turns out, she was right! Meet Adam, a nineteen-year-old about to enjoy his gap year bicycling all the way from his native England to the Middle East. Over-protected by his parents, who insist on safety issues that he, clearly does not need. Kaylah is doing Business Studies at Southgate University and daughter to Bishop Sam Kone, descendant of Caribbean immigrants and a television star. As any young woman, Kaylah does not agree with her parents’ beliefs,…

  • British,  Crime fiction

    The Lie by C.L. Taylor

    I think I must have heard about crime fiction author C.L. Taylor where I usually do, over Twitter. With time, I saw how some fellow bloggers praised her novels, and when I found myself browsing Waterstones Cardiff last year I came upon her novel The Lie and I bought it. The reason to choose The Lie among Taylor’s novels was simple and easy: The story involves Jane, a young, female main character who lives in a cottage in rural Wales, works at an animal sanctuary, and has a dark past. As I was spending my last morning in Cardiff, unsure on when I could return to Wales, I decided it…